Aishah got diagnosed with stage 4 ovarian cancer late 2019 after she thought she had a hernia. Aishah found the pandemic especially hard with her diagnosis and has been living alone for the last seven months. After her son had spent the first part of the pandemic living and caring with her.

"In October 2019 I went to see my doctor as I thought I had a hernia, they sent for tests and scans to be told I have stage 4 ovarian cancer, but they found it had spread and only gave me a 10% chance of living for a year.

When I first found out about my diagnosis I was devastated. I just wanted to give up, I felt there was nothing left to live for. I started sorting my house out so my family didn’t have too.

I was scared my granddaughter who was 11 at the time would forget about me, but also had great support from my daughter, son, family here and in Tunisia.

The hospice got in touch with me, and I spoke to Kim (Sister Wellbeing Centre), at the beginning I cried most of the way through the session with her. She rings every week, and really helped. She got my pain managed with my medication, she listens when I need it and overall is a great support for me.

I started struggling with my faith and Kim put me in touch with the Chaplain from the Hospice. I even managed to go to York for one night with my sister.

During the pandemic I had to go into hospital, which I struggled with. The hospice got me the care I needed and helped by getting me a counsellor to support not only the physical pain but mental pain as well. Before the hospice, I did not have access to any care, the only time I have had access to cancer nurses is after my surgeries.

All of the interaction I have had with the Hospice has been through the pandemic and we’ve not been able to attend, therefore I have spoken with people over the phone and zoom. It’s been amazing that I have still been able to access this care. I really couldn’t have got through it without them.

Through lockdown I have been shielding due to being vulnerable. I have lived alone for the last 7 months, therefore speaking to the nurses and counsellors at the hospice has really helped me focus and look towards the future.

It was my birthday at the end of March, just after the restrictions started to lift and you were able to meet up to six people/ 2 other households. I was able to have a birthday lunch with my son daughter and granddaughter in the garden. It was so lovely to spend that time with them.

The hospice has helped, I used to cry all the time, but now I am happier. I hope for longer so I can go visit my family in Tunisia, before I’m to unwell to travel. In their country they don’t have anything like the hospice, which makes me especially grateful. I am staying positive and although I know there isn’t a cure, I have hope for my future. As long as I can stay positive I can enjoy what I have, as you don’t know what’s around the corner.

I want to be happy as I want my children to do what makes them happy, love life and live it to it’s full.

Because the hospice has helped me so much I have been thinking about how I can help them. I have started writing poem’s which I send into the Hospice and they use them to help other people. I never thought about writing them before, but they have allowed me to reflect on everything and be grateful for what I have.

I am so thankful for what the Hospice has been able to do for me. It has allowed me to look at life differently and appreciate everything I have. I wouldn’t be here without them; they have given me hope."





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